History: Shibari / kinbaku is the art of Japanese bondage. Originating during the 17th century, it was at first a means of restraining prisoners. The ties had to be done quickly, precisely and thouroughly. In the Middle Ages, Shibari became a part of erotic games, and in the 1970’s it gained immense popularity in Japan, mostly due to photo albums and niche magazines. In Romania, Shibari is in full bloom, as more and more kinksters and artists are getting a taste for bondage.

My darkness: Where photography meets Shibari, where rope ties and unwinds infinite possibilities, there is my favorite playground.

Challenge: As a photographer, I’ve always been interested in nudes and erotica. There’s nothing sexier than a helpless, naked woman chained in the middle of a deserted landscape. I’ve been including bondage and BDSM elements in my photo projects throughout these last years, but since 2012 I’ve really started to explore and learn Shibari, developing a tight bond between rigging and taking pictures. Taking pictures is like “writing with light”, while Shibari is a way of writing with rope, creating art with subtle, ever expanding ties and limits. I am learning the rigger’s craft and pushing my photographer boundaries to the edge, always seeking new challenges, new imagery, new emotions. There is freedom in the tightness and precision of the ropes, as it is in the subtle play of shadows and light.

The bond: My work is influenced by the likes of Araki, Helmut Newton, David Lachapelle, Guido Argentini and Steven Meisel. I have a personal connection with the rope: I prepare it myself, step by step, getting closer to its texture and inner emotion as I would to a well sought-out photograph. There’s magic and freedom in details – and tangible perfection in the elements of a good rig and photograph. A photograph is a memory; a good Shibari rig is a sensation. The bond between the two is unbreakable, if done right… and the impression could last a long time, close to forever.